Discussion:
OT: The legal woes of Burton Silverman, artist for Jethro Tull's "Aqualung"
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l***@yahoo.com
2018-05-12 13:50:58 UTC
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I thought this was worth saving. He turns 90 soon. (Btw, Silverman also illustrated Rudyard Kipling's "Phantoms and Fantasies" and James Baldwin's "Go Tell It on the Mountain.")

https://theoutline.com/post/4490/jethro-tull-aqualung-cover-artist-burton-silverman?zd=1&zi=ckqnossb

It's written by his son Robert.




Lenona.
c***@aol.com
2018-05-12 17:12:19 UTC
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Is he dead?
Michael OConnor
2018-05-12 19:56:25 UTC
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Great album cover; hate to hear the story about the guy, and I don't know much about how album covers come about, or came about, as they are pretty much a lost art these days. I would guess it is a generally commissioned art or photography job, and it's not like the guy who does the cover art is going to get a cut of the album sales, and it sounds like that is what this guy is after. The bottom line is, when you sign a contract to do a job, be sure to read the fine print first.

Also, the guy has to keep in mind this was 1970, and Jethro Tull wasn't exactly the Rolling Stones or Bob Dylan or The Who, so nobody really knew this album was going to sell a gajillion copies. Also, nobody forsaw the compact disc and mp3 and digital download etc, so there was no way to anticipate the future and the money bands could make from such things. The popular artists of the 70's were very comfortable, but relatively speaking, they made peanuts compared to what the music artists today pull in.

And not to bash this guy, who contributed some fine artwork for this album, but once he turned in his pieces, his involvement with Jethro Tull was over. People didn't buy the album because of the album cover; they bought it because of the music, the stories it told. He should be proud that he will be remembered for creating one of the great album covers in rock history.

I remember about 20 years back hearing a radio interview with some guy who was trying to sue the Grateful Dead claiming he created their logo.
A Friend
2018-05-12 20:47:51 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
Great album cover; hate to hear the story about the guy, and I don't know
much about how album covers come about, or came about, as they are pretty
much a lost art these days. I would guess it is a generally commissioned art
or photography job, and it's not like the guy who does the cover art is going
to get a cut of the album sales, and it sounds like that is what this guy is
after. The bottom line is, when you sign a contract to do a job, be sure to
read the fine print first.
Also, the guy has to keep in mind this was 1970, and Jethro Tull wasn't
exactly the Rolling Stones or Bob Dylan or The Who, so nobody really knew
this album was going to sell a gajillion copies. Also, nobody forsaw the
compact disc and mp3 and digital download etc, so there was no way to
anticipate the future and the money bands could make from such things. The
popular artists of the 70's were very comfortable, but relatively speaking,
they made peanuts compared to what the music artists today pull in.
And not to bash this guy, who contributed some fine artwork for this album,
but once he turned in his pieces, his involvement with Jethro Tull was over.
People didn't buy the album because of the album cover; they bought it
because of the music, the stories it told. He should be proud that he will
be remembered for creating one of the great album covers in rock history.
I remember about 20 years back hearing a radio interview with some guy who
was trying to sue the Grateful Dead claiming he created their logo.
I felt sorry for the artist as well, but the album cover was a work for
hire, and so the $1500 he got for the job (more than $9600 in today's
money, which seems generous to me) is all he's entitled to. I wonder
what happened to the original art.

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