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Thomas Bopp, 68, co-discoverer, Hale-Bopp Comet -- per Wikipedia
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That Derek
2018-01-09 04:43:09 UTC
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Bopp

The other guy was named Alan Hale ... let the Gilligan jokes commence.
Michael OConnor
2018-01-09 05:07:30 UTC
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Bopp was his little buddy.
Bermuda999
2018-01-09 13:16:13 UTC
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Was he Unskinny?
Rick B.
2018-01-09 22:43:14 UTC
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Post by Bermuda999
Was he Unskinny?
Mmm, I dunno.
Bermuda999
2018-01-10 01:27:34 UTC
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Post by Rick B.
Post by Bermuda999
Was he Unskinny?
Mmm, I dunno.
<I see what you did there>
c***@aol.com
2018-01-10 14:56:06 UTC
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Wasn’t it Wolf-Biederman?
That Derek
2018-01-10 17:48:54 UTC
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https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/thomas-bopp-whose-name-was-memorialized-in-a-comet-dies-at-68/2018/01/09/4e081bc6-f552-11e7-b34a-b85626af34ef_story.html?utm_term=.961cd4006115

Obituaries

Thomas Bopp, whose name was memorialized in a comet, dies at 68

[PHOTO CAPTION] Comet hunters David Levy, Don Yeomans, Alan Hale and Thomas Bopp at a 1997 viewing of the Hale-Bopp and Wild 2 comets. Mr. Bopp and Hale were memorialized in the name of the Hale-Bopp comet, which they discovered within minutes of each other in 1995. (Mike Nelson/AFP/Getty Images)

By Harrison Smith

January 9 at 7:15 PM

On the night of July 22, 1995, the stars aligned for Thomas Bopp. A 47-year-old parts manager living in Glendale, Ariz., he worked for an asphalt and concrete supply company and had taken to stargazing on his Saturday nights, traveling to a remote patch of desert with a telescope-owning friend, Jim Stevens.

Though Mr. Bopp had been marveling at the heavens since childhood, when his father took him outside to see the Perseid meteor shower, he was still a hobbyist, unfamiliar with the locations of many deep-space galaxies, nebulae and star clusters.

Stevens, a telescope maker who had become something of an astronomical mentor for Mr. Bopp, urged his protege to step up to the lens to gaze at a prominent cluster of stars in the constellation Sagittarius. A few minutes after 11 p.m., however, Mr. Bopp saw not just the cluster but also “a little fuzzy glow,” he later told the Canadian magazine Maclean’s. “I thought I had a faint galaxy or something.”

Rather, Mr. Bopp — within minutes of another Southwest astronomer, 37-year-old Alan Hale — had discovered what is officially known as C/1995 O1, a dirty snowball of dust, rock and ice that went on to inspire a California death cult and light up the sky for hundreds of millions of observers around the world.

Mr. Bopp, who received a flurry of international attention and a form of scientific immortality from the Hale-Bopp comet that bears his name, died Jan. 5 at a hospital in Phoenix. He was 68.

The cause was liver failure, said his daughter, April Esch.

Mr. Bopp had never seen a comet before the summer of 1995, missing Halley’s in 1986 and the disappointing smudge of Comet Kohoutek in 1973. But he and Hale, unusually similar in appearance, became the balding, portly faces of comet science for several months in 1997, when the Hale-Bopp comet came within 122 million miles of Earth, sported a tail millions of miles long and landed the two astronomers on an episode of the TV show “Bill Nye the Science Guy” and on ABC News with the shared title of person of the week.

“I don’t do much,” Mr. Bopp told the Phoenix New Times, still taken aback at his newfound fame. “I have my work, my family, and I like to look at stars.”

At various times on that night in July 1995, the stargazers believed they had discovered Comet Bopp, Comet Bopp-Stevens and Comet Hale, following an astronomical convention in which a comet’s discoverers are credited by name.

Hale, who was unemployed at the time, had a doctorate in astronomy and had spotted dozens of comets outside his home in Cloudcroft, N.M. This one, he said in a phone interview, initially appeared as “just a dinky little fuzz ball,” showing no signs that it would eventually brighten and become visible to the naked eye.

Unaware of each other’s observations, he and Mr. Bopp spent several minutes tracking the comet, ensuring that it wasn’t a star cluster or some other object in the sky, before reporting their findings to the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams at Harvard University, which has long been known for the announcement of newly discovered astronomical objects.

Unlike Hale, however, Mr. Bopp was standing in the middle of the desert, with spotty cell service and far from a computer he could use to send an email. He drove 20 miles to a truck stop, according to an account in People magazine, and when a Western Union representative told him there was no address on file to send a telegram to the Central Bureau, Mr. Bopp got in his car again and drove all the way to Glendale. He eventually found the address at home and placed the telegram, well after Hale had sent multiple emails with detailed coordinates for the comet.
danny burstein
2018-01-10 17:52:31 UTC
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[snip]

But was he wearing sneakers when they found him?
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l***@fl.it
2018-01-10 19:38:55 UTC
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On Wed, 10 Jan 2018 17:52:31 +0000 (UTC), danny burstein
Post by danny burstein
[snip]
But was he wearing sneakers when they found him?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heaven%27s_Gate_(religious_group)

Kept thinking the name of the comet reminded me of something, I lived
by the sea at that point and it hung in the sky for a few nights and
was certainly somewhat mysterious to see. Not that I ever saw the
space ship following it :)
Alfalfa Bill
2018-01-11 00:51:21 UTC
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The likes of Bopp we shall not see again for another 2520 years.

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