Discussion:
Peggy Poole, 91, in July (British poet & radio broadcaster)
(too old to reply)
l***@yahoo.com
2016-08-07 23:54:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
She was born in Canterbury and worked for the Women's Royal Naval Service during WWII.

http://www.wirralglobe.co.uk/news/14629381.Peggy_Poole/?ref=arc
(tiny death notice from West Kirby, Wirral, Merseyside, England)

From "Contemporary Authors":


"In my children's books, fact mixes with fiction. Canal Holidays resulted in Brum, while Shadows on the Sand is set in Merseyside; and the controversial ending in Your Turn to Put the Light Out was 'dictated' to me in the night.

"For sixteen years I co-organised Jabberwocky, a monthly evening of poetry old and new, published and unpublished. Jabberwocky also produced four poetry collections and enjoyed readings from national poets including Stephen Spender, Ted Hughes, Seamus Heaney, Thom Gunn, and Douglas Dunn. I now run monthly poetry evenings at a local library, give readings, [contribute] articles for writing magazines, and adjudicate competitions.

"Reading other poets' work on radio is a responsibility I never underestimate, and I never cease to relish how radio can seduce and surprise people into enjoying poetry..."


WRITINGS:
POEMS
Never a Put-up Job (poetry), Quentin Nelson, 1970.
Cherry Stones and Other Poems, Headland (Wirral, England), 1983.
No Wilderness in Them, Windows (Liverpool, England), 1984.
Midnight Walk and Other Poems, Envoi (Newport, England), 1986.
Hesitations, Brentham Press (London, England), 1990.
Trusting the Rainbow, Brentham Press (London, England), 1994.
From the Tide's Edge, Melody, 1999.
Polishing Pans, Driftwood (Liverpool, England), 2001.

UNDER PSEUDONYM TERRY ROCHE
Brum (for children), illustrated by Beryl Sanders, Dobson (Brancepeth Castle, England), 1978.
("...But Brum knew what he was doing. Looking for a home he adopts Gill, still stunned by her parents' tragic death, and with her Di, her sister, and Ken, her brother-in-law, who carves beautiful wooden figures (mos attractive to puppies), longs to leave his nine-to-five city job and is by no means sure that he wants to share their boat with a stray mongrel. The characters they encounter - friendly, eccentric or downright unpleasant - as they travel slowly through the soothing countryside (which frequently turns out to be anything but soothing) and the odd situations in which they often find themselves add up to a funny, exciting and satisfying book.' ")

Shadows on the Sand (for children), Dobson (Brancepeth Castle, England), 1979.
(" Story of a child from a one-parent family accused of shoplifting and the prejudice she encounters. Runs away to small island in Liverpool Bay, from the River Dee.")

Your Turn to Put the Light Out (young adult), Dobson (Brancepeth Castle, England), 1980.

Sprig of Wild Heather (anecdotes), 1989.

OTHER
(Coeditor) Windfall (anthology), Kettleshill Press, 1994.
(Editor) Poet's England: Cunbaia, Headland (Wirral, England), 1995.
(Editor) Marigolds Grow Wild on Platforms: An Anthology of Railway Poems, Cassell, 1996.



Lenona.
l***@yahoo.com
2016-08-30 15:03:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
From Aug. 22. This includes a photo.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/aug/22/peggy-poole-obituary

"How we spent a lifetime dying / raised our glasses clowning / lest anyone should mark / that we were lost, crying / in the dark.” These lines from her poem On the Death of Stevie Smith show the solemn side of my mother, Peggy Poole, an award-winning poet and broadcaster, who has died aged 91.

She was best known as an unstinting champion of emerging poets: “Without her, I wouldn’t have written poetry,” one of them said. Another explained: “She opened the door to publication.”

Peggy’s first poetry collection, Never a Put-up Job, appeared in 1970, followed by Cherry Stones: And Other Poems (1983), Hesitations (1990), Trusting the Rainbow (1994), From the Tide’s Edge (1999), and more. Her Selected Poems was published in 2003. Her talents as an editor were exhibited in Poet’s England 17: Cumbria (1995), Marigolds Grow Wild on Platforms (1996), her significant anthology of railway poems, and Perceptions (2000), a collection of poems by women.

She produced the poetry section of Radio Merseyside’s literary programme First Heard (later Write Now) from 1967 until 1988, jointly ran the poetry group Jabberwocky from 1969 until 1985, and supported another, First Thursday, from 2001, providing platforms for new poets, involving Wirral schools and, with backing from the Poetry Society, attracting established poets, among them Stephen Spender, Ted Hughes, Seamus Heaney and Ursula Fanthorpe, to read at events.

An honorary member of Liverpool’s Dead Good Poets’ Society and Ver Poets, Peggy was a consultant for BBC North West, tutored poetry courses at the Swanwick writers’ summer school in Derbyshire, regularly contributed to Writers’ News and convened the Greasby poets group.

Fourth of five children of Barbara (nee Tate) and Reginald Thornton, Peggy grew up on her family’s farm in Kent, won an exhibition to Benenden school, and when denied entrance to the WRNS during the second world war on the grounds of age and health, she “just kept going until they’d have me”.

She married Reg Poole in 1949. His job at the Liverpool Council of Social Service took them to West Kirby, where stunning views over the Dee Estuary from her final two homes made their way into her poems. A later-life trip to Australia brought, in Peggy’s words, “unlimited magic” to her indomitable spirit. Dogs were Peggy’s constant companions; the nudge of a muzzle brought her joy.

In keeping with the spirit of her work, her family is establishing an award in her name to support developing poets. Reg died in 1994. Peggy is survived by their three daughters, Barbara, Elizabeth and me, six grandchildren, Emily, Jennifer, Edward, Hannah, Wil and Jenny, and four great-grandchildren.
t***@gmail.com
2017-02-25 13:28:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I remember a Mrs. Poole teaching at Gautby Road Primary School in the North End of Birkenhead in the late 1960s, specialising in Poetry. Was this the same person?
l***@yahoo.com
2017-02-25 21:22:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by t***@gmail.com
I remember a Mrs. Poole teaching at Gautby Road Primary School in the North End of Birkenhead in the late 1960s, specialising in Poetry. Was this the same person?
I never lived in England, and without her first name, I REALLY couldn't tell you. (Especially since my library's computer won't let me into Biography in Context right now.)

But she was certainly old enough at the time. However, she was also presumably married, given what the obit said. So, did married women in Britain get to teach school in the 1960s?


Lenona.
t***@gmail.com
2017-02-26 16:31:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Post by t***@gmail.com
I remember a Mrs. Poole teaching at Gautby Road Primary School in the North End of Birkenhead in the late 1960s, specialising in Poetry. Was this the same person?
I never lived in England, and without her first name, I REALLY couldn't tell you. (Especially since my library's computer won't let me into Biography in Context right now.)
But she was certainly old enough at the time. However, she was also presumably married, given what the obit said. So, did married women in Britain get to teach school in the 1960s?
Lenona.
Dear Lenona,

I remember that many - if not most - female teachers at Merseyside primary schools were indeed married. I attended Gautby Road between 1962 and 1968, aged 5 to 11.

As you've probably gleaned, she frequently worked for BBC Radio Merseyside, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year and has alluded to Mrs. Poole's passing on several occasions. Birkenhead is within this radio station's broadcasting area. I've checked with them but have received no reply thus far.

Her obituary in the "Wirral Globe" gives her home as West Kirby, which, like Birkenhead, is on the Wirral Peninsula.

Bizarrely, I also recall that Mrs. Poole was a strong swimmer who assisted in the school's swimming lessons.

Sincere thanks for taking the time to reply.

Loading...