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A Generation in Japan Faces a Lonely Death
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Topic Cop
2017-12-04 03:40:25 UTC
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https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/30/world/asia/japan-lonely-deaths-the-end.html

TOKIWADAIRA, Japan — Cicadas, every Japanese schoolchild knows, lie underground for years before rising to the earth’s surface in summer. They climb up the nearest tree, where they cast off their shells and start their short second lives. During their few days among us, they mate, fly and cry. They cry until their bodies are found on the ground, twitching in their last moments, or on their backs with their legs pointing upward.

Chieko Ito hated the din they made. They had just started shrieking, as they always did in early summer, and the noise would keep getting louder in the weeks to come, invading her third-floor apartment, making any kind of silence impossible. As one species of cicadas quieted down, another’s distinct cry would take over. Then, as the insects peaked in numbers, showers of dead and dying cicadas would rain down on her enormous housing complex, stopping only with the end of summer itself.

“You hear them from morning to evening,” she sighed.

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Michael OConnor
2017-12-04 06:29:28 UTC
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I remember one of the summers I lived in Cincinnati, must have been 2004, when we had the Cicadas. I had heard of them before but never lived thru them. It was sounded like crickets times a billion, and it wasn't just nighttime but their songs went on 24 hours a day for about six weeks and then they died and they fell all over everything. The fell all over the roads and sidewalks and cars and porches and they stank something fierce then they died. I learned that they have cycles where they come out once every IIRC 17 years and go into hibernation, but it could be different for different areas. I hope I never have to experience Cicadas again.
Charles Richmond
2017-12-04 08:03:23 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
I remember one of the summers I lived in Cincinnati, must have been 2004, when we had the Cicadas. I had heard of them before but never lived thru them. It was sounded like crickets times a billion, and it wasn't just nighttime but their songs went on 24 hours a day for about six weeks and then they died and they fell all over everything. The fell all over the roads and sidewalks and cars and porches and they stank something fierce then they died. I learned that they have cycles where they come out once every IIRC 17 years and go into hibernation, but it could be different for different areas. I hope I never have to experience Cicadas again.
The cycles if cicadas depend on the species of cicada. I know some
species have a 17 year cycle and some have a 13 year cycle. Always a
prime number... nature seems to be trying to maximize the separation of
the cycles of different species. During yhe cycled time the cicadas lay
their eggs for the next generation.
--
numerist at aquaporin4 dot com
David Carson
2017-12-04 20:03:05 UTC
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On Mon, 4 Dec 2017 02:03:23 -0600, Charles Richmond
Post by Charles Richmond
Post by Michael OConnor
I remember one of the summers I lived in Cincinnati, must have been 2004, when we had the Cicadas. I had heard of them before but never lived thru them. It was sounded like crickets times a billion, and it wasn't just nighttime but their songs went on 24 hours a day for about six weeks and then they died and they fell all over everything. The fell all over the roads and sidewalks and cars and porches and they stank something fierce then they died. I learned that they have cycles where they come out once every IIRC 17 years and go into hibernation, but it could be different for different areas. I hope I never have to experience Cicadas again.
The cycles if cicadas depend on the species of cicada. I know some
species have a 17 year cycle and some have a 13 year cycle. Always a
prime number... nature seems to be trying to maximize the separation of
the cycles of different species. During yhe cycled time the cicadas lay
their eggs for the next generation.
We have cicadas every summer in Houston. They don't seem to be as
numerous as the cyclical variety, but even one of them makes plenty of
noise. You'll see the brown husks on tree trunks and wood siding, but
not many actual dead cicadas.

When I was a kid, my friends used to shoot them with BB guns. If they
caught one, it would usually become a victim of the dreaded magnifying
glass.

Travoltron
2017-12-04 18:36:57 UTC
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I lived in Japan for a time and I hated the cicadas. Sometimes they
would cling directly to my screen window and buzz. The closet thing I
can approximate the sound to is like living next to an electrical power
plant.

I always assumed that the Japanese liked their sound, but I suppose that
after nine or ten decades of it, they get sick of it too.
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