Discussion:
Gary Geers, 84, longtime Phila. TV host/announcer (in November 2010)
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Diner
2011-01-04 01:13:56 UTC
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I was just checking the Philadelphia Inquirer website's photo gallery
of prominent Philadelphians who died in 2010, and was surprised by a
few passings I hadn't heard of. Here's one of them.

Gary Geers' voice was more familiar than his face - he was the main
announcer on KYW for decades. But he did a lot of onscreen work too,
as this very nice obit points out. He can be seen doing the weather
about two minutes into this 1989 clip:


http://www.philly.com/philly/obituaries/20101112_Gary_Geers__longtime_KYW_host_and_announcer__dies_at_84.html

Posted on Fri, Nov. 12, 2010
Gary Geers, longtime KYW host and announcer, dies at 84
By JOHN F. MORRISON
Philadelphia Daily News

LIVING WITH Gary Geers, there were certain immutable rules. The most
important was you had to tiptoe around the house after 8 p.m. because
that was when Gary went to bed.

After all, he had to be up at 3:30 a.m. to get to the KYW-TV studios,
at 5th and Market streets, by 4:30 a.m. to start his day's work as an
announcer. For 41 years, he followed that routine. He used to say that
if he didn't get that 7 1/2 hours of sleep he wasn't good for
anything.

Over his four decades of service to KYW, he hosted a farm show, a
religious program, did the weather, commercials, sign-ons and sign-
offs and other jobs. Geers' dulcet baritone became familiar to
generations of viewers and listeners.

He died Wednesday of cancer. He was 84 and lived in Sun City, near
Tampa, Fla., but had lived through most of his career in Lima,
Delaware County.

Gary's "Farm, Home and Garden Show," which ran Monday through Friday
from 5:35 to 5:45 a.m. for 38 years, was surprisingly popular for such
an early-morning broadcast that lasted only 10 minutes. But that
wasn't why Gary got up so early. The shows were taped in advance. He
got up to do the weather and whatever chores he had to deal with until
his shift ended about 3 p.m.

He loved it. That was why, when he retired in December 1994, he did so
reluctantly. When staffers congratulated him on his retirement, he
would respond, "Thanks - I guess."

He started at Channel 3 in 1953 doing live booth announcing and
commercials. In the '70s, he wrote and hosted two half-hour programs,
an animal-themed show called "Wildsville," and the religious-themed
"Connections." He also taught communications at Temple University.

Things started to go downhill for Gary in 1990, when the station
canceled the farm show and "Connections."

That left him in the role of staff announcer, a kind of utility man.
He was able to tape all his announcements for the day in an hour.

Gary was born in Bridgeton, N.J., to Christine and Nicholas Geers,
Dutch immigrants. He graduated from Upper Merion High School in 1944.
He enlisted in the Marine Corps and served in China, driving heavy
trucks, cooking, and doing other chores in a support outfit.

After leaving the service, he enrolled at Northwestern University and
graduated in 1951.

His father had been a nurseryman and groundskeeper for an estate in
Gladwyne, and Gary interviewed him occasionally for the farm show.

He started his broadcasting career in 1951 with WCAU-TV. He moved to
WFIL (later WPVI), and for a few months was a disc jockey for a show
later taken over by Dick Clark.

In 1953, he moved to WPTZ-TV, which evolved into KYW.

His daughter, Laurie Geers, remembers visiting him at the station when
she was a child.

"He was in a booth with a gigantic clock and a stack of papers," she
recalls. "One time, my brother punched me in the stomach and I yelled.
I was upset because I thought they would fire my Dad, but he thought
it was funny."

That was one of Gary Geers' main characteristics. He was always laid-
back, never rattled or upset. After retiring, he and his wife, the
former Roseann DeJohn, moved to Florida and enjoyed traveling and
tennis. He became active with the Sun City Center United Methodist
Church, Habitat for Humanity, and the American Cancer Society.

Besides his wife and daughter, he is survived by two sons, Gary Jr.
and David; a brother, Nicholas Geers; a sister, Margaret Speacht; his
former wife, Ann T. Geers, and two grandchildren.

About Philly.com | Copyright 2011
Diner
2011-01-04 01:23:57 UTC
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Post by Diner
I was just checking the Philadelphia Inquirer website's photo gallery
of prominent Philadelphians who died in 2010, and was surprised by a
few passings I hadn't heard of. Here's one of them.
One more thing: I was also surprised, in the same feature, to learn of
the death (in January 2010) of Ken Matz, who was the lead co-anchor on
WCAU's newscasts in the 1990s. Alas, I can't pull up an obit for him -
Newsbank thinks I haven't enabled cookies for their site, even though
I have - so if someone could post his obit here, I'd appreciate it.
Thanks.

-Tim
A Friend
2011-01-04 01:34:35 UTC
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In article
Post by Diner
Post by Diner
I was just checking the Philadelphia Inquirer website's photo gallery
of prominent Philadelphians who died in 2010, and was surprised by a
few passings I hadn't heard of. Here's one of them.
One more thing: I was also surprised, in the same feature, to learn of
the death (in January 2010) of Ken Matz, who was the lead co-anchor on
WCAU's newscasts in the 1990s. Alas, I can't pull up an obit for him -
Newsbank thinks I haven't enabled cookies for their site, even though
I have - so if someone could post his obit here, I'd appreciate it.
Thanks.
-Tim
Ken Matz, 63, former Channel 10 news anchor
By John Sullivan The Philadelphia Inquirer
Publication: LexisNexis
Date: Monday, January 25 2010

Jan. 25--Ken Matz, 63, a Philadelphia-born broadcaster who presided over
Channel 10's evening newscasts for more than five years in the 1990s,
died of cancer Saturday in Hershey, Pa. He had lived in Sarasota, Fla.,
since 1998.

During his early years in the broadcast booth, listeners tuned in to Mr.
Matz's calling the news on radio stations from Reading to Harrisburg to
Philadelphia. He graduated from Lebanon Valley College in 1969 and
started his Philadelphia career at top-40 radio station WIBG-AM.

Mr. Matz left WIBG in 1976 to join KYW NewsRadio. He stayed a year
before leaving Philadelphia to parlay his good looks and easy charm into
a spot in front of the camera in 1977.

Over the next 20 years, Mr. Matz would work in television in major
markets including Miami, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Baltimore.

Shortly after returning to Philadelphia in 1993 to work at Channel 10,
Mr. Matz covered a March blizzard that some called the storm of the
century.

During the winter storm coverage, his calm tone and even delivery
prompted Channel 10 news director Drew Berry to tell The Inquirer: "He
puts people at ease. If the world was coming to an end, I would want Ken
Matz to tell me."

Mr. Matz and his wife at the time, Phyllis Walton Matz, and their son,
Justin, lived in Wynnewood during his stint at Channel 10.

During a major snowstorm in '96, Mr. Matz's mother died of a heart
attack minutes before he was to go on the air. Mr. Matz wanted to stay,
but his bosses ordered him home, according to a news report.

Mr. Matz anchored the news with Jane Robelot until 1998 before taking
over as sole anchor. Later that year, he retired to Sarasota.

Even as a youth in Shillington, Pa., Mr. Matz loved broadcasting, Walton
Matz said.

"He would practice while making announcements in a supermarket he worked
in," she said. "He was a great man who loved what he did. He was a real
person in an industry where a lot of people aren't."

Besides his son, Mr. Matz is survived by his wife, Deborah, and a
grandson.

Funeral arrangements were not complete last night.


http://thurly.net/0jg9
orpheus
2011-01-04 03:16:50 UTC
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Post by A Friend
In article
Post by Diner
Post by Diner
I was just checking the Philadelphia Inquirer website's photo gallery
of prominent Philadelphians who died in 2010, and was surprised by a
few passings I hadn't heard of. Here's one of them.
One more thing: I was also surprised, in the same feature, to learn of
the death (in January 2010) of Ken Matz, who was the lead co-anchor on
WCAU's newscasts in the 1990s. Alas, I can't pull up an obit for him -
Newsbank thinks I haven't enabled cookies for their site, even though
I have - so if someone could post his obit here, I'd appreciate it.
Thanks.
-Tim
Ken Matz, 63, former Channel 10 news anchor
By John Sullivan The Philadelphia Inquirer
Publication: LexisNexis
Date: Monday, January 25 2010
Jan. 25--Ken Matz, 63, a Philadelphia-born broadcaster who presided over
Channel 10's evening newscasts for more than five years in the 1990s,
died of cancer Saturday in Hershey, Pa. He had lived in Sarasota, Fla.,
since 1998.
During his early years in the broadcast booth, listeners tuned in to Mr.
Matz's calling the news on radio stations from Reading to Harrisburg to
Philadelphia. He graduated from Lebanon Valley College in 1969 and
started his Philadelphia career at top-40 radio station WIBG-AM.
Mr. Matz left WIBG in 1976 to join KYW NewsRadio. He stayed a year
before leaving Philadelphia to parlay his good looks and easy charm into
a spot in front of the camera in 1977.
Over the next 20 years, Mr. Matz would work in television in major
markets including Miami, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Baltimore.
Shortly after returning to Philadelphia in 1993 to work at Channel 10,
Mr. Matz covered a March blizzard that some called the storm of the
century.
During the winter storm coverage, his calm tone and even delivery
prompted Channel 10 news director Drew Berry to tell The Inquirer: "He
puts people at ease. If the world was coming to an end, I would want Ken
Matz to tell me."
Mr. Matz and his wife at the time, Phyllis Walton Matz, and their son,
Justin, lived in Wynnewood during his stint at Channel 10.
During a major snowstorm in '96, Mr. Matz's mother died of a heart
attack minutes before he was to go on the air. Mr. Matz wanted to stay,
but his bosses ordered him home, according to a news report.
Mr. Matz anchored the news with Jane Robelot until 1998 before taking
over as sole anchor. Later that year, he retired to Sarasota.
Even as a youth in Shillington, Pa., Mr. Matz loved broadcasting, Walton
Matz said.
"He would practice while making announcements in a supermarket he worked
in," she said. "He was a great man who loved what he did. He was a real
person in an industry where a lot of people aren't."
Besides his son, Mr. Matz is survived by his wife, Deborah, and a
grandson.
Funeral arrangements were not complete last night.
http://thurly.net/0jg9
Hey Diner. Thanks for posting this. I know Gary Geer's son, Gary
Jr.. I hadn't heard about his Dad's death.

God, can you imagine having to be at work at 3:30 am for 41 years
straight?
Diner
2011-01-04 04:17:12 UTC
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Post by A Friend
Ken Matz, 63, former Channel 10 news anchor
Thanks.
-Tim
Joe Pucillo
2011-01-04 05:12:57 UTC
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Wasn't it Diner who said...
Post by Diner
Gary Geers' voice was more familiar than his face - he was the main
announcer on KYW for decades.
Gary Geers was one of the six major "voices" of my early
childhood - the others being John Facenda, Paul Norton, Gene
Crane, Bill Campbell and Harry Kalas. Of these, I guess Crane
and Campbell are the only ones left.

I remember getting up early in the morning and being fascinated
by Geers' face (one always knew the voice, but rarely saw him)
as he gave the early morning Farm Report, talking about pork
bellies and such.



JP
s***@suddenlink.net
2017-10-23 19:01:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Diner
I was just checking the Philadelphia Inquirer website's photo gallery
of prominent Philadelphians who died in 2010, and was surprised by a
few passings I hadn't heard of. Here's one of them.
Gary Geers' voice was more familiar than his face - he was the main
announcer on KYW for decades. But he did a lot of onscreen work too,
as this very nice obit points out. He can be seen doing the weather
about two minutes into this 1989 clip: http://youtu.be/ejPX57doQ10
http://www.philly.com/philly/obituaries/20101112_Gary_Geers__longtime_KYW_host_and_announcer__dies_at_84.html
Posted on Fri, Nov. 12, 2010
Gary Geers, longtime KYW host and announcer, dies at 84
By JOHN F. MORRISON
Philadelphia Daily News
LIVING WITH Gary Geers, there were certain immutable rules. The most
important was you had to tiptoe around the house after 8 p.m. because
that was when Gary went to bed.
After all, he had to be up at 3:30 a.m. to get to the KYW-TV studios,
at 5th and Market streets, by 4:30 a.m. to start his day's work as an
announcer. For 41 years, he followed that routine. He used to say that
if he didn't get that 7 1/2 hours of sleep he wasn't good for
anything.
Over his four decades of service to KYW, he hosted a farm show, a
religious program, did the weather, commercials, sign-ons and sign-
offs and other jobs. Geers' dulcet baritone became familiar to
generations of viewers and listeners.
He died Wednesday of cancer. He was 84 and lived in Sun City, near
Tampa, Fla., but had lived through most of his career in Lima,
Delaware County.
Gary's "Farm, Home and Garden Show," which ran Monday through Friday
from 5:35 to 5:45 a.m. for 38 years, was surprisingly popular for such
an early-morning broadcast that lasted only 10 minutes. But that
wasn't why Gary got up so early. The shows were taped in advance. He
got up to do the weather and whatever chores he had to deal with until
his shift ended about 3 p.m.
He loved it. That was why, when he retired in December 1994, he did so
reluctantly. When staffers congratulated him on his retirement, he
would respond, "Thanks - I guess."
He started at Channel 3 in 1953 doing live booth announcing and
commercials. In the '70s, he wrote and hosted two half-hour programs,
an animal-themed show called "Wildsville," and the religious-themed
"Connections." He also taught communications at Temple University.
Things started to go downhill for Gary in 1990, when the station
canceled the farm show and "Connections."
That left him in the role of staff announcer, a kind of utility man.
He was able to tape all his announcements for the day in an hour.
Gary was born in Bridgeton, N.J., to Christine and Nicholas Geers,
Dutch immigrants. He graduated from Upper Merion High School in 1944.
He enlisted in the Marine Corps and served in China, driving heavy
trucks, cooking, and doing other chores in a support outfit.
After leaving the service, he enrolled at Northwestern University and
graduated in 1951.
His father had been a nurseryman and groundskeeper for an estate in
Gladwyne, and Gary interviewed him occasionally for the farm show.
He started his broadcasting career in 1951 with WCAU-TV. He moved to
WFIL (later WPVI), and for a few months was a disc jockey for a show
later taken over by Dick Clark.
In 1953, he moved to WPTZ-TV, which evolved into KYW.
His daughter, Laurie Geers, remembers visiting him at the station when
she was a child.
"He was in a booth with a gigantic clock and a stack of papers," she
recalls. "One time, my brother punched me in the stomach and I yelled.
I was upset because I thought they would fire my Dad, but he thought
it was funny."
That was one of Gary Geers' main characteristics. He was always laid-
back, never rattled or upset. After retiring, he and his wife, the
former Roseann DeJohn, moved to Florida and enjoyed traveling and
tennis. He became active with the Sun City Center United Methodist
Church, Habitat for Humanity, and the American Cancer Society.
Besides his wife and daughter, he is survived by two sons, Gary Jr.
and David; a brother, Nicholas Geers; a sister, Margaret Speacht; his
former wife, Ann T. Geers, and two grandchildren.
About Philly.com | Copyright 2011
I'm searching for archived shows by Gary Geers. Do they exist? Specifically May 13 - 19, 1974. ***@suddenlink.net thanks
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