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Dr. Allan Goldblatt, Helped Heal Children's Hearts, 72
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DGH
2004-11-26 19:58:51 UTC
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Dr. Goldblatt, A Newton, Massachusetts, residnet and a doctor for at
least four decades, who was also affiliated with Harvard Medical
School, died from cancer on Tuesday, November 23, 2004, at
Massachusetts General Hospital, at the age of 72.

Doctor Allan Goldblatt would start his 12-hour day at the hospital at
5 a.m. so he could make it home in time for dinner with his family.

At work, the pediatric cardiologist was just as dedicated with his
patients and their parents, answering their pages of questions and
concerns with comforting words at any hour.

"My dad loved being a doctor; it was in the very fiber of his being,"
Lisa Goldblatt Grace said. "He wanted to care for, to heal, in the
purest sense. He disliked bureaucracy and insurance and any protocol
which he felt got in the way of him serving his patients."

Born in Brooklyn, New York, Dr. Goldblatt attended Albany Medical
College in Albany, New York.

After working his first two jobs at the National Institutes of Health
in Maryland and Children's Hospital in Boston, Dr. Goldblatt helped
start the pediatric cardiology department at MGH in 1965.

"He was so beloved by his patients," said Dr. Richard Liberthson, a
cardiologist who worked with Dr. Goldblatt for 26 years at MGH. "He
had the old style of patient care, where the doctor was part of the
family."

Every holiday season, patients would send countless baked goods and
handmade crafts as tokens of their appreciation. Dr. Goldblatt was
known to care for children and their families, regardless of their
ability to pay.

After retiring from caring for patients, he worked for MGH's Quality
Assessment Program for almost nine years, advocating for patients'
rights and compassionate care.

Dr. Goldblatt inspired his children to dedicate their lives to
service. "My brothers and I saw him as a hero, and each of us sought
to replicate this in our own professional life," his daughter said.
"Steven served in Iraq, Jim is a police officer, and I am a social
worker. I can't begin to count the number of times that strangers told
me that my Dad saved their child or brought their family hope."

Her father was also a romantic, hopelessly in love with his wife of 43
years. Friends often recounted how they saw Dr. Goldblatt and his
wife, Joan C. (Lewis), holding hands as they walked down Commonwealth
Avenue. His daughter frequently found his love notes to his wife in
greeting cards around the house.

Aside from his passion for medicine, his patients, and family, Dr.
Goldblatt loved all things Sinatra and old jazz, brownies that came
out slightly gooey, drinking a martini with his wife, singing loudly
during Jewish High Holy Day services, the beach in Wellfleet, and the
Red Sox.

Dr. Goldblatt believed that "the greatest mistake of all is to do
nothing if you can only do a little" -- his favorite quote, his
daughter said.
j***@gmail.com
2013-01-09 06:03:18 UTC
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Post by DGH
.
Dr. Goldblatt, A Newton, Massachusetts, residnet and a doctor for at
least four decades, who was also affiliated with Harvard Medical
School, died from cancer on Tuesday, November 23, 2004, at
Massachusetts General Hospital, at the age of 72.
Doctor Allan Goldblatt would start his 12-hour day at the hospital at
5 a.m. so he could make it home in time for dinner with his family.
At work, the pediatric cardiologist was just as dedicated with his
patients and their parents, answering their pages of questions and
concerns with comforting words at any hour.
"My dad loved being a doctor; it was in the very fiber of his being,"
Lisa Goldblatt Grace said. "He wanted to care for, to heal, in the
purest sense. He disliked bureaucracy and insurance and any protocol
which he felt got in the way of him serving his patients."
Born in Brooklyn, New York, Dr. Goldblatt attended Albany Medical
College in Albany, New York.
After working his first two jobs at the National Institutes of Health
in Maryland and Children's Hospital in Boston, Dr. Goldblatt helped
start the pediatric cardiology department at MGH in 1965.
"He was so beloved by his patients," said Dr. Richard Liberthson, a
cardiologist who worked with Dr. Goldblatt for 26 years at MGH. "He
had the old style of patient care, where the doctor was part of the
family."
Every holiday season, patients would send countless baked goods and
handmade crafts as tokens of their appreciation. Dr. Goldblatt was
known to care for children and their families, regardless of their
ability to pay.
After retiring from caring for patients, he worked for MGH's Quality
Assessment Program for almost nine years, advocating for patients'
rights and compassionate care.
Dr. Goldblatt inspired his children to dedicate their lives to
service. "My brothers and I saw him as a hero, and each of us sought
to replicate this in our own professional life," his daughter said.
"Steven served in Iraq, Jim is a police officer, and I am a social
worker. I can't begin to count the number of times that strangers told
me that my Dad saved their child or brought their family hope."
Her father was also a romantic, hopelessly in love with his wife of 43
years. Friends often recounted how they saw Dr. Goldblatt and his
wife, Joan C. (Lewis), holding hands as they walked down Commonwealth
Avenue. His daughter frequently found his love notes to his wife in
greeting cards around the house.
Aside from his passion for medicine, his patients, and family, Dr.
Goldblatt loved all things Sinatra and old jazz, brownies that came
out slightly gooey, drinking a martini with his wife, singing loudly
during Jewish High Holy Day services, the beach in Wellfleet, and the
Red Sox.
Dr. Goldblatt believed that "the greatest mistake of all is to do
nothing if you can only do a little" -- his favorite quote, his
daughter said.
Dr Goldblatt was a hero to my son and myself.My son Billy Burrill loved and trusted him so much.Before his coarctation surgery my son was going for his first heart catherization My son then 6 yrs hopped up on the stretcher and saw tears in my eyes,my son wiped my tears away and said"Don't worry mom it is like Dr Golblatt said No Pain No Gain". I can't express my love enough for Dr Goldblatt or thank him enough as my son born at 2 lbs is now 30 years old.RIP you will always be remembered.Love Billy Burrill and family .
l***@yahoo.com
2013-02-06 05:07:11 UTC
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Post by DGH
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Dr. Goldblatt, A Newton, Massachusetts, residnet and a doctor for at
least four decades, who was also affiliated with Harvard Medical
School, died from cancer on Tuesday, November 23, 2004, at
Massachusetts General Hospital, at the age of 72.
Doctor Allan Goldblatt would start his 12-hour day at the hospital at
5 a.m. so he could make it home in time for dinner with his family.
At work, the pediatric cardiologist was just as dedicated with his
patients and their parents, answering their pages of questions and
concerns with comforting words at any hour.
"My dad loved being a doctor; it was in the very fiber of his being,"
Lisa Goldblatt Grace said. "He wanted to care for, to heal, in the
purest sense. He disliked bureaucracy and insurance and any protocol
which he felt got in the way of him serving his patients."
Born in Brooklyn, New York, Dr. Goldblatt attended Albany Medical
College in Albany, New York.
After working his first two jobs at the National Institutes of Health
in Maryland and Children's Hospital in Boston, Dr. Goldblatt helped
start the pediatric cardiology department at MGH in 1965.
"He was so beloved by his patients," said Dr. Richard Liberthson, a
cardiologist who worked with Dr. Goldblatt for 26 years at MGH. "He
had the old style of patient care, where the doctor was part of the
family."
Every holiday season, patients would send countless baked goods and
handmade crafts as tokens of their appreciation. Dr. Goldblatt was
known to care for children and their families, regardless of their
ability to pay.
After retiring from caring for patients, he worked for MGH's Quality
Assessment Program for almost nine years, advocating for patients'
rights and compassionate care.
Dr. Goldblatt inspired his children to dedicate their lives to
service. "My brothers and I saw him as a hero, and each of us sought
to replicate this in our own professional life," his daughter said.
"Steven served in Iraq, Jim is a police officer, and I am a social
worker. I can't begin to count the number of times that strangers told
me that my Dad saved their child or brought their family hope."
Her father was also a romantic, hopelessly in love with his wife of 43
years. Friends often recounted how they saw Dr. Goldblatt and his
wife, Joan C. (Lewis), holding hands as they walked down Commonwealth
Avenue. His daughter frequently found his love notes to his wife in
greeting cards around the house.
Aside from his passion for medicine, his patients, and family, Dr.
Goldblatt loved all things Sinatra and old jazz, brownies that came
out slightly gooey, drinking a martini with his wife, singing loudly
during Jewish High Holy Day services, the beach in Wellfleet, and the
Red Sox.
Dr. Goldblatt believed that "the greatest mistake of all is to do
nothing if you can only do a little" -- his favorite quote, his
daughter said.
j***@gmail.com
2013-08-04 10:29:12 UTC
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Dr. Goldblatt was my pediatric cardiologist from ages 6 months to 18 when I moved to Florida from Massachusetts to attend college in 1994. Dr. Goldblatt was such a kind a caring man and by far my all time favorite personal doctor. Twice per year and eventually once per year I would make the 3 hour trip to Boston with my parents so that the appropriate diagnostic tests could be run on my heart, which was found to have a bicuspid aortic valve. I actually came to love the city of Boston thru these trips, for many reasons, but in large part because at the end of a long morning of tests at Mass General I got to finally meet with Dr. Goldblatt in his little old basement office. He always reassured me that I had a "beautiful" heart and I never left his office not feeling better about myself, and life. Upon my visit to Pittsfield this summer I learned from my parents who had seen his long time assistant Trish, also a Pittsfield native, that Dr. Goldblatt had passed in 2004, it saddened me but also made me remember him with such fondness and ultimately drove me to search online for any info about his passing. This was a "beautifully" written obit which I am thankful to have found and read, helping me to learn more wonderful things about a man that I already held in such high regard. Dr. Goldblatt thank you for all that you did for me and my parents during my youth. You will ALWAYS hold a very special and magical place in my 'beautiful' heart.

John Vincent - Coral Springs, FL
t***@gmail.com
2016-09-16 19:12:14 UTC
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Dr. Goldblatt was my doctor as a child. Seeing a new doctor now who worked with him made me wonder if he was still practicing. It's sad to hear that he has passed. I am 37 now, I still remember seeing him as a child and him telling me how beautiful my heart always sounded. I was born with pulmonary stenosis and saw him from birth until I was in my early teens I believe. He was truly an amazing person.
s***@gmail.com
2018-07-09 01:40:47 UTC
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In 1980 I gave birth to a son at Berkshire Medical Center in Pittsfield, MA. Mark was a large baby weighing 9 lbs 10 oz. with a high APKAR score. He and I were discharged from the hospital uneventfully (as far as I knew) in a timely fashion. His pediatric practice wanted to see him back in their office at the end of the week. When we returned there Mark was examined by all 3 Dr.s in the practice. At that point they explained to me that they had not liked the way Mark had looked in the hospital and that now none of them were able to feel a femoral pulse. Their question to me next was where did I want to take this baby, Albany or Boston? Boston was my choice where my husband and I brought our son the next morning, with several X-rays in hand. It was there we met Alan Goldblatt, in that little basement office at Mass General. After a very few polite hellos and a brief physical exam Dr. Goldblatt quickly slapped up Mark’s X-rays on his display. We were abruptly informed that Mark was in serious trouble. Immediately he called his girl in the front office to check the enrollment to which she responded there were no beds available. He instructed her to then admit our son “emergency cardiac arrest”. He then turned to us and asked me what our religion was and asked our permission to have him baptized immediately. Heads spinning we said yes, please and off Mark went. Dr. Goldblatt then proceeded to explain that if he could repair parts of Mark’s problem he would have a chance to live, if not he would not.
Naturally this story goes on, details of which are numerous, but on that day in early February I handed my son over to a total stranger in a matter of minutes and KNEW he was in the hands of an earth angel.
This story does not have a happy ending. At one point I can remember sharing with Dr. Goldblatt that we would not want our son to live less than a full life. He said we all would just have to wait for God to send us a sign. When it came he said the decision would be made for us. More than once over the following 3 months I can remember him sharing with me his frustration with the lack of a “sign”. Soon it was clear that there was nothing more he could do for Mark. He was transferred home by ambulance to BMC in Pittsfield where he died in pediatric intensive care a month later.
Through the outcome was less than desirable I felt from the first day I met Alan Goldblatt I had met one hell of a man. He has never left my mind and while watching 60 Minutes tonight the Goldblatt name was mentioned and my internet search began...I wonder where he is today. I was saddened to find that cancer had taken him in 2004 and then I found this lovely obituary. Your father left this world a better place. Beyond that there is no greater accomplishment. Treasure your memories and love those around you. You were blessed, as was I, to have been allowed to benefit from the wisdom of this great man❤️
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