Discussion:
Paul Kangas, "Nightly Business Report," 79
(too old to reply)
David Carson
2017-03-03 16:16:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/obituaries/article135764688.html
‘Nightly Business Report’ anchor Paul Kangas dies at 79

By Howard Cohen
***@miamiherald.com

Paul Kangas, the main anchor of the PBS “Nightly Business Report,”
developed such a rapport with viewers over his 30 years with the
made-in-Miami TV program, some would trust him with just about
anything.

As news of Kangas’ declining health spread, Linda O’Bryon, founding
“Nightly Business Report” executive editor and the original co-anchor
who shared that duty with Kangas for years, began to reflect on their
professional moments together. She remembered a particular caller, a
woman in her mid-90s, who Kangas went out of his way to help.

Once a week, O’Bryon said, this woman would call into WPBT’s North
Miami studio and ask to speak with Kangas. She couldn’t see too well
and she didn’t trust anyone to tell her what her stocks were doing. So
every week, Kangas would take her call after filming his segment and
go over her portfolio of stocks with her.

Her stocks turned out to be worth a couple million dollars.
The point, O’Bryon, said, is that someone reached out to Kangas and it
didn’t matter who it was. “I think that sort of speaks volumes for how
he was so trusted by people who really depended on this information —
whether they were investors or not,” she said.

Kangas built a sizable national audience for the economic news program
and helped earn “Nightly Business Report” its only Emmy, for coverage
of emerging trends in China. He had lived in Aventura since the
mid-1970s and died Tuesday at 79 from a series of health
complications, including Parkinson’s and advanced prostate cancer, his
stepson Mark Elieff said.

“He was a kind, generous man who went out of his way to help people
who were on the way up,” Elieff said. “Some people don’t want to give
away their secrets.”

One who watched, and learned, was Tom Hudson, now the vice president
of news and a special correspondent for WLRN radio. Hudson replaced
Kangas on the “Nightly Business Report” after Kangas stepped down from
his anchor role on Dec. 31, 2009 — 30 years after initially joining
the program as its stock-market commentator.

“Paul was a pioneer of business news on television. When he and
‘Nightly Business Report’ began in 1979, investors had to wait until
the next morning’s newspaper for closing stock prices. His nightly
stock market reports still resonate through today’s ubiquitous market
data,” Hudson said.

Even technological advances, like stock apps on cellphones and the
internet, couldn’t topple Kangas.

“He would tell a story that even after real-time stock quotes were
available online, a viewer would regularly call Paul for closing price
for AT&T because she wanted to hear it from him,” Hudson said. “I feel
lucky that I was able to share the anchor desk with Paul Kangas, even
if it was only for a few weeks, including a ‘NBR’ tradition — a
black-tie broadcast on New Year’s Eve.”

Kangas, respected for his warm demeanor, intellect and his fast-paced,
fact-packed stock summary reports on air, managed with cheat sheets
that he’d make before going on camera, Elieff said. “He did it all off
the top of his head; there wasn’t a script.”

[continues at URL]
David Carson
2017-03-03 16:45:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Carson
As news of Kangas’ declining health spread, Linda O’Bryon, founding
“Nightly Business Report” executive editor and the original co-anchor
who shared that duty with Kangas for years,
He would read a story, and then the camera would switch over to
O'Bryon for her turn. She would say, "Well, Paul, ..." and then read
her story, as if it were directed _to him_ or was part of some
personal conversation they were having. This annoyed me enough to make
me turn off the program as soon as Kangas finished his first story.

David Carson
Anglo Saxon
2017-03-03 17:58:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Carson
Post by David Carson
He would read a story, and then the camera would switch over to
O'Bryon for her turn. She would say, "Well, Paul, ..." and then read
her story, as if it were directed _to him_ or was part of some
personal conversation they were having. This annoyed me enough to make
me turn off the program as soon as Kangas finished his first story.
Agreed. He certainly did not need her. I appreciated the whole deal with
that guy; he made a profoundly boring (but vital) part of life into data I
could use. Old-school, dignified human being.
c***@aol.com
2017-03-03 18:16:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Of course, "she" created the show.
Anglo Saxon
2017-03-03 19:01:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by c***@aol.com
Of course, "she" created the show.
Oh, is that right? She certainly hit it out of the park with that effort.
But why is the word she in quotation marks? Was there some doubt about
gender?
c***@aol.com
2017-03-03 19:16:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
No just the dismissive way the original poster referred to her.
Anglo Saxon
2017-03-03 19:40:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by c***@aol.com
No just the dismissive way the original poster referred to her.
To this day, our huge and dysfunctional family cannot utter "she", "her",
"him", or "he" in relation to a member. Funny. It was considered to be the
lowest form of brain activity, and even now we as individuals are very
skilled at structuring verbal sentences on the fly to avoid that sin. :)
Honest to God, I think the very first thing I remember as an infant
emerging into childhood was my father thundering, "DO NOT REFER TO YOUR
MOTHER AS SHE!", towards an older sibling. I couldn't talk yet, but yes, I
heard that very same voice in that very same tone when I was 13 and being
shoved out the kitchen door for saying it. lol

I miss our dead ones.
David Carson
2017-03-03 22:18:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Carson
Post by David Carson
As news of Kangas’ declining health spread, Linda O’Bryon, founding
“Nightly Business Report” executive editor and the original co-anchor
who shared that duty with Kangas for years,
He would read a story, and then the camera would switch over to
O'Bryon for her turn. She would say, "Well, Paul, ..." and then read
her story, as if it were directed _to him_ or was part of some
personal conversation they were having. This annoyed me enough to make
me turn off the program as soon as Kangas finished his first story.
Ellsworth-Specific Version:
Kangas would read a story, and then the camera would switch over to
O'Bryon for O'Bryon's turn. O'Bryon would say, "Well, Paul, ..." and then
read O'Bryon's story, as if it were directed _to Kangas_ or was part of
some personal conversation O'Bryon and Kangas were having. This annoyed me
enough to make me turn off the program as soon as Kangas finished Kangas's
first story.

Loading...